Biography:

One of their most recent publications is The exclusion principle and equivalent potentials for scattering of complex neutral particles☆. Which was published in journal Annals of Physics.

More information about Peter Swan research including statistics on their citations can be found on their Copernicus Academic profile page.

Peter Swan's Articles: (6)

The exclusion principle and equivalent potentials for scattering of complex neutral particles☆

AbstractIn many cases of atomic or nuclear scattering involving two complex particles, the Pauli exclusion principle forbids formation of compound cluster states with certain intercluster quantum numbers. This occurs whenever the compound state would involve more than a full shell of electrons, neutrons or protons. Instead, the particles are repelled into the first available excited principal quantum number state n′lj of the center-of-mass motion of the two composite particle clusters. For Mlj excluded compound states (differing only in n-values), the phase/binding energy-equivalent two-body potential should have a repulsive core V(r → 0) → 2Mlj(2l + 2Mlj + 1)(′22μr2). The lj-state two-body wave function ulj(r) thus behaves like an (l + 2Mlj)-state function for r → 0, ulj(r → 0) ≈ rl+2Mlj+1. A distorted inverse square barrier wave approximation (DISBWA) enables one to deduce these repulsive core potentials for any ljMlj combination. For l = 0, the Pauli barrier may be conveniently approximated by an Eckart potential, and the DISBWA wavefunction has an analytic form. An application to elastic n−α scattering phases results in an entirely repulsive potential for l = 0, the small attractive optical-model potential being completely swamped by the Pauli barrier. A physical interpretation pictures the α-particle nucleons with large l = 0 and small l ⩾ 1 components in the n−α system. The l = 0, S = 1, n−n component leads to a 6′22μr2 repulsion, which is “damped” by the incident neutron interaction with the other three α-nucleons, giving a finite barrier range 1λB. The l ⩾ 1 components result in the small optical model interaction with the l = 0 incident neutron.

The exclusion principle and equivalent potentials for scattering of complex neutral particles☆

AbstractIn many cases of atomic or nuclear scattering involving two complex particles, the Pauli exclusion principle forbids formation of compound cluster states with certain intercluster quantum numbers. This occurs whenever the compound state would involve more than a full shell of electrons, neutrons or protons. Instead, the particles are repelled into the first available excited principal quantum number state n′lj of the center-of-mass motion of the two composite particle clusters. For Mlj excluded compound states (differing only in n-values), the phase/binding energy-equivalent two-body potential should have a repulsive core V(r → 0) → 2Mlj(2l + 2Mlj + 1)(′22μr2). The lj-state two-body wave function ulj(r) thus behaves like an (l + 2Mlj)-state function for r → 0, ulj(r → 0) ≈ rl+2Mlj+1. A distorted inverse square barrier wave approximation (DISBWA) enables one to deduce these repulsive core potentials for any ljMlj combination. For l = 0, the Pauli barrier may be conveniently approximated by an Eckart potential, and the DISBWA wavefunction has an analytic form. An application to elastic n−α scattering phases results in an entirely repulsive potential for l = 0, the small attractive optical-model potential being completely swamped by the Pauli barrier. A physical interpretation pictures the α-particle nucleons with large l = 0 and small l ⩾ 1 components in the n−α system. The l = 0, S = 1, n−n component leads to a 6′22μr2 repulsion, which is “damped” by the incident neutron interaction with the other three α-nucleons, giving a finite barrier range 1λB. The l ⩾ 1 components result in the small optical model interaction with the l = 0 incident neutron.

The exclusion principle and equivalent potentials for scattering of complex neutral particles☆

AbstractIn many cases of atomic or nuclear scattering involving two complex particles, the Pauli exclusion principle forbids formation of compound cluster states with certain intercluster quantum numbers. This occurs whenever the compound state would involve more than a full shell of electrons, neutrons or protons. Instead, the particles are repelled into the first available excited principal quantum number state n′lj of the center-of-mass motion of the two composite particle clusters. For Mlj excluded compound states (differing only in n-values), the phase/binding energy-equivalent two-body potential should have a repulsive core V(r → 0) → 2Mlj(2l + 2Mlj + 1)(′22μr2). The lj-state two-body wave function ulj(r) thus behaves like an (l + 2Mlj)-state function for r → 0, ulj(r → 0) ≈ rl+2Mlj+1. A distorted inverse square barrier wave approximation (DISBWA) enables one to deduce these repulsive core potentials for any ljMlj combination. For l = 0, the Pauli barrier may be conveniently approximated by an Eckart potential, and the DISBWA wavefunction has an analytic form. An application to elastic n−α scattering phases results in an entirely repulsive potential for l = 0, the small attractive optical-model potential being completely swamped by the Pauli barrier. A physical interpretation pictures the α-particle nucleons with large l = 0 and small l ⩾ 1 components in the n−α system. The l = 0, S = 1, n−n component leads to a 6′22μr2 repulsion, which is “damped” by the incident neutron interaction with the other three α-nucleons, giving a finite barrier range 1λB. The l ⩾ 1 components result in the small optical model interaction with the l = 0 incident neutron.

The exclusion principle and equivalent potentials for scattering of complex neutral particles☆

AbstractIn many cases of atomic or nuclear scattering involving two complex particles, the Pauli exclusion principle forbids formation of compound cluster states with certain intercluster quantum numbers. This occurs whenever the compound state would involve more than a full shell of electrons, neutrons or protons. Instead, the particles are repelled into the first available excited principal quantum number state n′lj of the center-of-mass motion of the two composite particle clusters. For Mlj excluded compound states (differing only in n-values), the phase/binding energy-equivalent two-body potential should have a repulsive core V(r → 0) → 2Mlj(2l + 2Mlj + 1)(′22μr2). The lj-state two-body wave function ulj(r) thus behaves like an (l + 2Mlj)-state function for r → 0, ulj(r → 0) ≈ rl+2Mlj+1. A distorted inverse square barrier wave approximation (DISBWA) enables one to deduce these repulsive core potentials for any ljMlj combination. For l = 0, the Pauli barrier may be conveniently approximated by an Eckart potential, and the DISBWA wavefunction has an analytic form. An application to elastic n−α scattering phases results in an entirely repulsive potential for l = 0, the small attractive optical-model potential being completely swamped by the Pauli barrier. A physical interpretation pictures the α-particle nucleons with large l = 0 and small l ⩾ 1 components in the n−α system. The l = 0, S = 1, n−n component leads to a 6′22μr2 repulsion, which is “damped” by the incident neutron interaction with the other three α-nucleons, giving a finite barrier range 1λB. The l ⩾ 1 components result in the small optical model interaction with the l = 0 incident neutron.

The existence of single-channel scattering resonances

AbstractIt is shown for single-channel scattering of l = 0 neutral particles by a monotonically decreasing attractive potential that scattering resonances (as opposed to shape resonances) are possible only for zero incident energy and then ony if lim r3 U(r) = 0. For l ≧ 1limr→∞ neutral particles or for l ≧ 0 like or unlike charged particles, broad scattering resonances for k2 > 0 are possible with monotonically decreasing potentials, implying that the phase-shift increases through an odd mulitple of 12π. Potentials not wholly attractive and monotonically decreasing with r may produce scattering resonances (i), if k2 = 0, l = 0 and lim r3U(r) = 0 limr→∞ (neutral particles only) and (ii) if k2 > 0, l ≧ 0 and lim r2U(r) = 0 (neutral and limr→∞ charged particles), a favoured case of the latter being a potential surrounded by a high potential barrier.

Space elevator maturing into a Galactic Harbour

Highlights•3 modern Space Elevator Architectures merged into vision of Galactic Harbour.•Galactic Harbour is a new term for Space Elevator infrastructures.•Galactic Harbour Unifies Transportation and Business Enterprises.

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