Biography:

In the past Toshiya Abe has collaborated on articles with Sho Endo and Kenji Waizumi. One of their most recent publications is Original ResearchFull Report: Basic and Translational—PancreasAutophagy Is Required for Activation of Pancreatic Stellate Cells, Associated With Pancreatic Cancer Progression and Promotes Growth of Pancreatic Tumors in Mice. Which was published in journal Gastroenterology.

More information about Toshiya Abe research including statistics on their citations can be found on their Copernicus Academic profile page.

Toshiya Abe's Articles: (3)

Original ResearchFull Report: Basic and Translational—PancreasAutophagy Is Required for Activation of Pancreatic Stellate Cells, Associated With Pancreatic Cancer Progression and Promotes Growth of Pancreatic Tumors in Mice

Background & AimsPancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) change from a quiescent to activated state in the tumor environment and secrete extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and cytokines to increase the aggressiveness of tumors. However, it is not clear how PSCs are activated to produce these factors, or whether this process can be inhibited. PSCs have morphologic and functional similarities to hepatic stellate cells, which undergo autophagy to promote fibrosis and tumor growth. We investigated whether autophagy activates PSCs, which promotes development of the tumor stroma and growth of pancreatic tumors in mice.MethodsWe used immunofluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry to analyze pancreatic tumor specimens from 133 patients who underwent pancreatectomy in Japan from 2000 to 2009. PSCs were cultured from pancreatic tumor tissues or tissues of patients with chronic pancreatitis; these were analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblots, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and in assays for invasiveness, proliferation, and lipid droplets. Autophagy was inhibited in PSCs by administration of chloroquine or transfection with small interfering RNAs. Proteins were knocked down in immortalized PSCs by expression of small hairpin RNAs. Cells were transplanted into pancreatic tails of nude mice, and tumor growth and metastasis were quantified.ResultsBased on immunohistochemical analyses, autophagy was significantly associated with tumor T category (P = .018), histologic grade (P = .001), lymph node metastases (P < .001), stage (P = .009), perilymphatic invasion (P = .001), and perivascular invasion (P = .003). Autophagy of PSCs was associated with shorter survival times of patients with pancreatic cancer. PSC expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, a marker of autophagosomes, was associated with poor outcomes (shorter survival time, disease recurrence) for patients with pancreatic cancer (relative risk of shorter survival time, 1.56). Immunoblots showed that PSCs from pancreatic tumor samples expressed higher levels of markers of autophagy than PSCs from chronic pancreatitis samples. Inhibitors of autophagy increased the number of lipid droplets of PSCs, indicating a quiescent state of PSCs, and reduced their production of ECM molecules and interleukin 6, as well as their proliferation and invasiveness in culture. PSCs exposed to autophagy inhibitors formed smaller tumors in nude mice (P = .001) and fewer liver metastases (P = .018) with less peritoneal dissemination (P = .018) compared to PSCs not exposed to autophagy inhibitors.ConclusionsAutophagic PSCs produce ECM molecules and interleukin 6 and are associated with shorter survival times and disease recurrence in patients with pancreatic cancer. Inhibitors of PSC autophagy might reduce pancreatic tumor invasiveness by altering the tumor stroma.

Formation of [CoCl4(H2O)2]2− complex in CoCl2·MgCl2·8H2O double salt: structural and energetic properties of [MCl4(H2O)2]2− and [M(H2O)6]2+ (M=Mg, Co)

AbstractThe crystal structure of the double salt CoCl2·MgCl2·8H2O has been determined by the X-ray diffraction method. It crystallizes in the space group P1̄ with a=6.0976(9), b=6.308(1), c=8.579(3) Å, α=81.99(2)°, β=88.40°, γ=84.61(1)°, Z=1, and R=0.027. The crystal consists of two kinds of well separated octahedra, [CoCl4(H2O)2]2− and [Mg(H2O)6]2+. The former is unique as aquachloro complexes of Co2+. In order to elucidate the reason prepared as such unique complexes in the double salts, formation energies for [MCl4(H2O)2]2− and [M(H2O)6]2+ (M=Co, Mg) have been calculated by using the density functional methods, and it has been revealed that the formation energies of the first coordination sphere for the metal ions and the Cl−⋯H2O hydrogen bond networks around [CoCl4(H2O)2]2− play a decisive role in forming [CoCl4(H2O)2]2− with the regular octahedral geometry in the double salt.

PancreasClinical importance of intraoperative peritoneal cytology in patients with pancreatic cancer

BackgroundThe clinical importance of intraoperative peritoneal cytology in patients with pancreatic cancer remains incompletely understood.MethodsPeritoneal washing samples were collected from 411 consecutive patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma from 1996 to 2014. Of the 411 patients, 335 underwent macroscopically curative resection and 76 with noncurative factors did not undergo resection. We compared long-term outcomes between patients with positive cytology (cytology+) and those with negative cytology (cytology−) and investigated the importance of clinicopathologic factors.ResultsOf 335 patients with curative resection, 300 (89.6%) were cytology− and 35 (10.4%) were cytology+. The median overall survival of cytology+ patients was less than that of cytology− patients (16 vs 31 months, respectively; P < .0001). The median overall survival of cytology+ patients with noncurative factors was significantly worse than that of cytology+ patients with curative resection (6.9 vs 16.0 months, respectively; P = .0023). The median disease-free survival of cytology+ patients was less than that of cytology− patients (6.5 vs 16 months, respectively; P < .0001). In the multivariate analysis, cytology+ was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival and disease-free survival.ConclusionCytology+ without noncurative factors was a predictive factor for a poor prognosis. Therefore, it is important to regard patients with pancreatic cancer characterized by cytology+ as a special group that may warrant more aggressive adjuvant therapy.

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