Biography:

In the past Julie A. Nelson has collaborated on articles with Rakhi P. Naik. One of their most recent publications is Clinical research studyVenous Thromboembolism in Adults with Sickle Cell Disease: A Serious and Under-recognized Complication. Which was published in journal The American Journal of Medicine.

More information about Julie A. Nelson research including statistics on their citations can be found on their Copernicus Academic profile page.

Julie A. Nelson's Articles: (2)

Clinical research studyVenous Thromboembolism in Adults with Sickle Cell Disease: A Serious and Under-recognized Complication

AbstractBackgroundSickle cell disease is recognized as a hypercoagulable state; however, the frequency and characteristics of venous thromboembolism in sickle cell patients have not been well defined. The purpose of this study was to establish the prevalence and risk factors for venous thromboembolism in a large cohort of patients with sickle cell disease and determine the relationship between venous thromboembolism and mortality.MethodsWe performed a cross-sectional study of 404 sickle cell disease patients cared for at the Sickle Cell Center for Adults at Johns Hopkins. Demographic, sickle cell disease-specific comorbidity, and venous thromboembolism data were collected on all patients.ResultsOne hundred one patients (25%) had a history of venous thromboembolism with a median age at diagnosis of 29.9 years. A history of non-catheter-related venous thromboembolism was found in 18.8% of patients. Sickle variant genotypes conferred a higher risk of non-catheter-related venous thromboembolism compared with sickle cell anemia genotypes (SS/Sβ0) (relative risk [RR] 1.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-2.66). Tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity ≥2.5 m/s also was associated with non-catheter-related venous thromboembolism (RR 1.65; 95% CI, 1.12-2.45). Thirty patients (7.4%) died during the study period. Adjusting for all variables, non-catheter-related venous thromboembolism was independently correlated with death (RR 3.63; 95% CI, 1.66-7.92).ConclusionVenous thromboembolism is common in adults with sickle cell disease. Sickle variant genotypes and tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity ≥2.5 m/s are associated with non-catheter-related venous thromboembolism. In addition, non-catheter-related venous thromboembolism appears to be an independent risk factor for death in our cohort. These results suggest that disease-specific prophylaxis and treatment strategies for venous thromboembolism should be investigated in sickle cell disease patients.

Methods: Feature ArticleBetween a rock and a soft place: Ecological and feminist economics in policy debates☆

AbstractThe field of ecological economics includes both economic analysis on the one hand, and discussions of normative values and visions for society, on the other. Using feminist insights into cultural beliefs about the relative “hardness” and “softness” of these two sides, this essay discusses how ecological economists can use this unique “between” space in order to better inform policy. The current crisis of global climate change, it is argued, requires that economists move beyond modeling and measurement, while ecological thinkers need to re-examine beliefs about markets and profit.

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