Biography:

In the past Ming Shen has collaborated on articles with Sophie M. Carpentier and Sophie M Carpentier. One of their most recent publications is Heterograft (research)Do donor or recipient species influence calcification of bioprosthetic tissues?**. Which was published in journal The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

More information about Ming Shen research including statistics on their citations can be found on their Copernicus Academic profile page.

Ming Shen's Articles: (40)

Heterograft (research)Do donor or recipient species influence calcification of bioprosthetic tissues?**

To determine whether donor or recipient species influence calcification of bioprosthetic tissues, glutaralde hyde-treated valvar or pericardial specimens from different species (calf, sheep, pig) were subcutaneously implanted in different animals (rat, rabbit, cow, hen). Significant differences in the rate of calcification of the implanted specimens were found, which have important practical and theoretical implications for the development of valvular bioprostheses.

Heterograft (research)Do donor or recipient species influence calcification of bioprosthetic tissues?**

To determine whether donor or recipient species influence calcification of bioprosthetic tissues, glutaralde hyde-treated valvar or pericardial specimens from different species (calf, sheep, pig) were subcutaneously implanted in different animals (rat, rabbit, cow, hen). Significant differences in the rate of calcification of the implanted specimens were found, which have important practical and theoretical implications for the development of valvular bioprostheses.

Heterograft (research)Do donor or recipient species influence calcification of bioprosthetic tissues?**

To determine whether donor or recipient species influence calcification of bioprosthetic tissues, glutaralde hyde-treated valvar or pericardial specimens from different species (calf, sheep, pig) were subcutaneously implanted in different animals (rat, rabbit, cow, hen). Significant differences in the rate of calcification of the implanted specimens were found, which have important practical and theoretical implications for the development of valvular bioprostheses.

Heterograft (research)Do donor or recipient species influence calcification of bioprosthetic tissues?**

To determine whether donor or recipient species influence calcification of bioprosthetic tissues, glutaralde hyde-treated valvar or pericardial specimens from different species (calf, sheep, pig) were subcutaneously implanted in different animals (rat, rabbit, cow, hen). Significant differences in the rate of calcification of the implanted specimens were found, which have important practical and theoretical implications for the development of valvular bioprostheses.

Basic researchBiochemical properties of heat-treated valvular bioprostheses

AbstractBackground. Preliminary studies showed that heat treatment of glutaraldehyde preserved valvular bioprostheses mitigates calcification. This study was carried out to define the physicochemical characteristics of the heat-treated tissues to elucidate the mechanism involved in the mitigation.Methods. Glut bovine pericardium or porcine valve samples were treated at 50°C in a 0.625% glutaraldehyde solution for 2 months. Some samples underwent assay for shrinkage temperature, moisture content, ninhydrin test, and acid hydrolysis, and other samples were incubated in human serum for 3 days and then analyzed by electrophoresis to study protein adsorption.Results. Heat treatment mitigated calcification without adversely affecting shrinkage temperature (84.81°C versus 83.95°C) and moisture content (78.68% versus 78.71%). A significant reduction in free amino groups (0.15 versus 0.37 mol NH2/mol collagen) and a significant increase in resistance to acid hydrolysis were observed. Total protein content was similar, but significant differences were found for four proteins adsorbed in the tissues (167, 45, 11.6, and 10 kDa).Conclusions. The anticalcification effect of heat treatment may be attributed to structural changes, lipid extraction, increased resistance, and modifications of the type and concentration of the proteins adsorbed in the tissue.

Basic researchEffect of ethanol and ether in the prevention of calcification of bioprostheses

AbstractBackground. Lipids play a significant role in the process of calcification of bioprostheses. We assessed whether lipid extraction by ethanol, ether, or a surfactant could mitigate calcification of glutaraldehyde-treated bioprostheses.Methods. On 200 bovine pericardium samples pretreated with 0.6% glutaraldehyde, lipid extraction was carried out by ethanol, ether, or the tween 80 surfactant, and combinations thereof. The treated tissues were implanted subcutaneously in 50 juvenile rats for 4 and 6 months. Lipids were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer and chromatography before implantation. Calcium content of implanted tissues was assessed by atomic absorption spectrometer.Results. Ethanol, ether, or surfactant did mitigate calcification. The most efficient pretreatments were the combination of ethanol and surfactant (calcium content: 15.5 ± 6.8 μg/mg dry tissue after 6 months implantation) or the combination of ethanol, ether, and surfactant (13.1 ± 6.2 μg/mg dry tissue) when compared with surfactant alone (42.9 ± 12.7 μg/mg dry tissue).Conclusions. Ethanol or the combination of ethanol and ether added to the currently used glutaraldehyde-surfactant treatment further mitigates calcification.

Basic researchEffect of human immunoglobulins on the immunogenicity of porcine bioprostheses

AbstractBackground. Glutaraldehyde fixation (GT) is known to reduce immunologic reactions and tissue degeneration after implantation in humans. Sterilization after glutaraldehyde fixation (G-ST) improves the safety and reduces the tendency of GT valves to calcify. Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) have been shown to reduce xenogeneic response against porcine tissue. We have investigated the effect of these fixation procedures combined with and without IVIg on the antigenicity of bioprostheses.Methods. Lewis adult rats were implanted subcutaneously with a fresh, GT, or G-ST porcine heart valve pre- or posttreated with different amounts of IVIg. We followed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and IgM and IgG titers against protein extracts from the porcine heart valves after implantation. Cellular reactivity was assessed in xenogeneic lymphoendothelial coculture experiments. Calcification content was also examined.Results. Glutaraldehyde fixation partially decreased the humoral response against proteins of the implant but elicited a cellular xenogeneic response. Sterilization reduced these reactivities, but retained antigenicity. Intravenous immunoglobulin postincubated with GT valves before implantation reduced the antigenicity of the tissue to the same extent as G-ST valves, but had no effect on valvular tissue calcification.Conclusions. Our studies demonstrate that IVIg or the sterilization procedure (ST) reduced the cellular response against glutaraldehyde-fixed valves (GT), whereas reduced calcification was observed only with ST.

Original ArticlesHeat treatment mitigates calcification of valvular bioprostheses

AbstractBackground. Several techniques have been proposed to mitigate calcification of glutaraldehyde-preserved bioprostheses. None has been fully satisfactory. Knowing that heat induces significant molecular changes, we investigated the potential benefit of the heat treatment of glutaraldehyde-fixed tissues.Methods. Samples of porcine valves and bovine pericardium treated in 0.625% glutaraldehyde were submitted to temperatures from 37° to 70°C for 2 to 12 weeks and then implanted subcutaneously in newborn rats for 3 months. In a second protocol, nine heat-treated porcine valve bioprostheses and seven control porcine valve bioprostheses were implanted in the mitral position in sheep for 20 weeks.Results. Spectrophotometry and x-ray analysis comparing heat-treated versus non–heat-treated tissues showed the following: porcine valve: 6.7 ± 2.3 μg Ca/mg (n = 8) versus 239.9 ± 2.9 μg Ca/mg (n = 8); bovine pericardium: 19.5 ± 8 μg Ca/mg (n = 6) versus 108 ± 10.3 μg Ca/mg (n = 8); and porcine valve bioprostheses: 0 versus ++.Conclusions. Heat treatment of glutaraldehyde-treated bioprostheses significantly mitigated calcification in both subcutaneous and mitral position.

In situ growth of three-dimensional graphene coatings on arbitrary-shaped micro/nano materials and its mechanism studies

AbstractIn the past decade, there have been great advances in the controllable growth of two-dimensional (2D) graphene sheets. However, the preparation of 3D structured graphene such as graphene coatings on arbitrary-shaped micro/nano materials still remains a formidable challenge. Herein, we have proposed a general strategy for the in situ growth of 3D graphene coatings on the micro/nano particles with arbitrary shapes. Inspired by the CVD growth mechanism of 2D graphene sheets on the bulk metal substrates, we have in situ constructed a nanometer-thick catalytic interface on the micro/nano particle surface by introducing a trace amount of transition metal salts and solid carbon sources with strictly-controlled content and ratio. Growth of 3D graphene coatings is accomplished through a solid-state reaction. Under the catalysis of the in situ formed catalytic interface consisting of highly-ordered metal nanoislands, the nano-thick amorphous carbon layer which arousing from the pyrolysis of carbon sources can be effectively transformed into a continuous and uniform graphene coating throughout the material surface based on a “dissolution–precipitation” mechanism. 3D graphene coatings have been successfully grown on lithium iron phosphate, silver, copper and silicon particles. The growth mechanism of the 3D graphene coatings has been studied in detail and a growth model is also proposed.

Capacity loss induced by lithium deposition at graphite anode for LiFePO4/graphite cell cycling at different temperatures

Highlights•Capacity fading of a LiFePO4/graphite cell was investigated at different temperatures.•Lithium inventory loss was found to be the main cause for the capacity loss.•High temperature accelerates lithium ion consumption during charge–discharge cycles.•Most of the consumed lithium is found on the graphite anode surface.

Role of human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells in promoting osteogenic differentiation by influencing p38 MAPK signaling in lipopolysaccharide -induced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

Highlights•LPS inhibites osteogenic differentiation in HBMSCs via suppression of p38 MAPK signaling pathway.•HAMSCs promote LPS-induced HBMSCs osteogenic differentiation through p38 MAPK signaling pathway.•HAMSCs reverse LPS-induced oxidative stress in LPS-induced HBMSCs through p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

Regular ArticleHighly reversible lithium storage in cobalt 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate metal-organic frameworks boosted by pseudocapacitance

AbstractExploiting novel metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as electrode materials with superior rate capabilities and understanding their electrochemical behaviour in detail are crucial for boosting the application of MOFs in the field of energy storage. Herein, we prepared Co2(DOBDC) (DOBDC = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) via a hydrothermal method and explored its electrochemical performance as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries. The as-prepared Co2(DOBDC) MOF exhibits a reversible capacity of 526.1 mA h g−1 after 200 charge/discharge cycles at a current density of 500 mA g−1 and also demonstrates an impressive rate capability, with a high capacity of 408.2 mA h g−1 at a high current density of 2 A g−1. Furthermore, synchrotron-based soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (sXAS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy have been applied to investigate the spin state of cobalt in the electrodes at different states of charge. Our results suggest that localized electrons in high-spin (S = 3/2) Co2+ in pristine Co2(DOBDC) are gradually delocalized after discharging. It was also found that the high rate capability of Co2(DOBDC) is mainly ascribed to an ultrafast ion intercalation pseudocapacitance process, which results from its unique microporous architecture and adequate specific surface that offers sufficient electrode/electrolyte contact and benefits fast Li+ ion diffusion.

Regular ArticleOne-step synthesis of hexylresorcinol calix[4]arene-capped ZnO–Ag nanocomposites for enhanced degradation of organic pollutants

AbstractIn this study, hexylresorcinol calix[4]arene (HRCA) is introduced into the reaction system, and HRCA-capped ZnO–Ag nanocomposites are prepared via a simple one-step reflux method. HRCA is used not only as a reducing agent for deoxidizing Ag+ to Ag, but also as a protectant for wrapping around the microstructure of the formed ZnO–Ag. The prepared samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and water contact angle. The Ag nanoparticles and ZnO adhere to each other and HRCA molecules encapsulate on the surface of ZnO–Ag nanocomposites. HRCA-capped ZnO–Ag nanocomposites with different Ag contents are investigated for use in photodegradation of organic pollutants (rhodamine B (RhB) and levofloxacin hydrochloride). The sample with 10.20 mol% Ag, denoted as ZA3, exhibits the highest catalytic activity for photodegradation of RhB and levofloxacin hydrochloride. Moreover, ZA3 exhibits high stability during photodegradation of organic pollutants even after multiple reuses. The possible photocatalytic mechanism is discussed. We believe that O2− and h+ are the chief active species responsible for the photocatalytic activity of HRCA-capped ZnO–Ag nanocomposite system. HRCA-capped ZnO–Ag nanocomposite is expected to be an effective photocatalyst with potential application to sewage treatment under sunlight.

Cardiopulmonary support and physiologyExhaled carbon monoxide and inducible heme oxygenase expression in a rat model of postperfusion acute lung injury☆

AbstractObjectiveExpression of inducible heme oxygenase has been shown to be increased in various visceral inflammatory disorders, which may confer a protective role. The purpose of our study was to determine whether the expression of inducible heme oxygenase was up-regulated within lungs in a rat model of extracorporeal circulation.MethodsWistar rats underwent either a partial femoro-femoral extracorporeal circulation in normothermia for 3 hours (n = 5) or a sham procedure (n = 5). Exhaled carbon monoxide concentration was monitored with an infrared analyzer. After the rats were killed, lungs were harvested for determination of heme oxygenase activity and inducible heme oxygenase expression (by Western blot and immunohistochemistry). Lung injury was also assessed by arterial blood gas analysis and microscopic study.ResultsExtracorporeal circulation was responsible for a lung injury characterized by decreased arterial blood oxygen saturation and typical morphologic findings (marked alveolar neutrophil infiltration; interstitial edema). Exhaled carbon monoxide concentration remained stable throughout the experiment in all sham rats, whereas it increased after extracorporeal circulation (from 0.16 ± 0.05 ppm at baseline to 0.7 ± 0.2 ppm at end of experiment; P = .0001). Pulmonary heme oxygenase activity and inducible heme oxygenase content (assessed by Western blot) were increased within lungs of rats that underwent extracorporeal circulation. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the expression of inducible heme oxygenase was mainly localized to inflammatory cells.ConclusionsPost–extracorporeal circulation acute lung injury in rats was associated with an increased expression of inducible heme oxygenase, the functional significance of which remains to be determined.

The preparation of silver sulfide nanoparticles in lamellar liquid crystal and application to lubrication

AbstractThe silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanoparticles were prepared by the reaction of AgNO3 and Na2S in the lamellar liquid crystal (LLC) formed by Triton X-100, n-C10H21OH and H2O. The size of the particles is about 2–3 nm. The existence of Ag2S nanoparticles can improve the lubrication of the lamellar liquid crystal.

Elliptic incoherent accessible solitons in strongly nonlocal media

AbstractWe study the propagation of elliptic incoherent accessible solitons in strongly nonlocal media with noninstantaneous Kerr nonlinearity. For this soliton to exist, the coherence properties of the incoherent beam should be anisotropic. The total power of the incident beam should also equal to a critical value which depend on the beam width as well as the coherence properties. When initial parameters of the beam do not satisfy the existence conditions, the elliptic incoherent accessible solitons will undergo linear harmonic oscillation in different states. Corresponding properties are studied in detail.

Incoherently coupled vector dipole soliton pairs in nonlocal media

AbstractWe investigate the incoherently and strongly coupled Manakov vector dipole soliton pairs in nonlocal nonlinear media. We use variational approach, to describe analytical properties of these solutions in a strongly nonlocal regime. We show that the presence of fundamental component improve stability of the dipole nonlocal soliton. In the limit of highly nonlocal nonlinearity, the evolution behaviors of the vector solitons is determined by their total power.

Vortex solitons with inhomogeneous polarization in nonlocal self-focusing nonlinear media

AbstractBoth azimuthally and radially polarized vortex solitons are investigated to be able to exist in highly nonlocal nonlinear media. We get exactly analytical solutions of azimuthally polarized vortex solitons with only polarization singularities and radially polarized vortex solitons with both phase singularities and polarization singularities. Both azimuthally and radially polarized vortex solitons can exist in nonlocal self-focusing nonlinear media with proper modulation of the beam power and the degree of nonlocality. Contrary to those of radially polarized counterparts in local Kerr media, the topological charge can be any integer. When the topological charge m ≠ 0, both phase singularities and polarization singularities work. When m = 0, the polarization singularities work. Azimuthally polarized vortex solitons with polarization singularities corresponds to the linearly polarized vortex solitons with single charge. Our results show that polarization singularities work the same way as phase singularities in some sense.

Inversion of inherent optical properties in optically complex waters using sentinel-3A/OLCI images: A case study using China's three largest freshwater lakes

Highlights•The IOPs in studied lakes show great optical variations and dynamics.•An optimized QAA algorithm is successfully used to estimate the components of IOPs.•IOPs and associated OACs were derived from OLCI data of lakes in the LYHR basin.•The uncertainties of IOPs provided pixel-by-pixel quality information.

A substituted benzene ring synthesis

AbstractN-Aminopyrroles are used in a new, versatile and high yield substituted benzene ring synthesis.

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