Biography:

In the past M. Golay has collaborated on articles with A. Vuillemin. One of their most recent publications is U.V. astronomy with balloons. Which was published in journal Advances in Space Research.

More information about M. Golay research including statistics on their citations can be found on their Copernicus Academic profile page.

M. Golay's Articles: (2)

U.V. astronomy with balloons

AbstractBalloon platforms are becoming more and more reliable as carriers of infrared and UV equipment. The balloon environment offers conditions of lower emissivity and higher transparency of the atmosphere. Precise photometric and spectroscopic measurements can be made in all spectral interval exceeding 1950 Å. Stabilized and unexpensive gondola are now available. Thus, high and low resolution spectra can be obtained for numerous stars. Accurate UV-multiband photometry and spectrophotometry are possible for stars members of large galactic clusters. A stabilized astronomical gondola was carrying a Schmidt photographic camera with UV microchannel plate image converter-intensifier. Systematic surveys of the galactic plane and the galactic poles are in progress. The quality of the UV image is good enough to allow a fine morphological analysis of the large galaxies, to detect a large number of nuclei of galaxies and nebulosities.

UV (2000Å) observations of nearby well resolved spiral galaxies

AbstractUV (2000Å) images of nearby well resolved galaxies (M31, M33, M51, M81, M101 and NGC4258) have been obtained during repetitive flights of a balloon-borne 40-cm, 12 – 20 arcsec resolution telescope. In the case of M51, the ultraviolet flux was derived for 36 circular regions where published gas contents exist. After corrections for dust extinction, the UV luminosity per unit area is found to correlate the HI+H2 surface density and thus confirms that the total gas density is a driving parameter for large scale star formation processes.

Advertisement
Join Copernicus Academic and get access to over 12 million papers authored by 7+ million academics.
Join for free!

Contact us