Biography:

One of their most recent publications is Research-articleRisk factors for bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk in Prince Edward Island dairy herds. Part 1: Overall risk factors. Which was published in journal Journal of Dairy Science.

More information about A.M. Elmoslemany research including statistics on their citations can be found on their Copernicus Academic profile page.

A.M. Elmoslemany's Articles: (4)

Research-articleRisk factors for bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk in Prince Edward Island dairy herds. Part 1: Overall risk factors

AbstractThe objective of this study was to determine on-farm risk factors for bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk. Bulk tank raw milk quality was evaluated on all Prince Edward Island dairy herds (n = 235) over a 2-yr period (March 2005 to March 2007). Biweekly total bacterial, preliminary incubation, laboratory pasteurization, and coliform counts were conducted using a Petrifilm culture system. For the assessment of risk factors, a case-control study was conducted from January 2006 to May 2007. Case and control herds were defined based on the last 6 analyses of bulk tank bacterial counts before on-farm evaluation. Cases were herds that had multiple elevated counts for any of the parameters measured. A total of 69 herds (39 cases and 30 control herds) were evaluated. Data collection included 1) observation and questionnaire on basic hygiene and farm management practices; 2) complete wash analysis of the milking equipment, monitoring the presence of bacterial films on equipment and evaluation of cooling system function; and 3) environmental and cow hygiene scoring. Data were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. The results of the final model indicated that high alkalinity in the wash water and poor teat-end cleanliness were associated with high bacterial counts in bulk tank milk (odds ratios = 12 and 5.3, respectively). It was also observed that high water temperature of detergent wash and the use of a water softener were associated with low bacterial counts in bulk tank milk (odds ratios = 0.87 and 0.11, respectively). A significant association between udder hair clipping and teat-end cleanliness was also observed. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of udder hygiene and milking system washing factors on hygienic quality of bulk tank milk.

Research-articleRisk factors for bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk in Prince Edward Island dairy herds. Part 2: Bacteria count-specific risk factors

AbstractA case-control study was conducted to identify specific on-farm risk factors that influence bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk in Prince Edward Island dairy herds. Total aerobic (TAC), preliminary incubation (PIC), laboratory pasteurization (LPC), and coliform (CC) counts were used to assess the bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk. Four case-control groups were defined based on the last 6 results of each test before on farm evaluation. A herd was classified as a TAC, PIC, or CC case when the herd had at least 4 high TAC, PIC, or CC counts out of the last 6 analyses for each test, respectively. For the LPC case group, a herd was required to have at least 3 high results out of the last 6 analyses. Control groups had low counts in the last 6 analyses for each test in the corresponding case group (TAC, PIC, CC, and LPC). The results of the study showed that TAC and PIC were mainly associated with cow and stall hygiene: washing the teats with water, not using teat predip, and dirty teats were risk factors. The LPC and CC were related to equipment hygiene, with high counts being associated with low temperature of the cleaning solution, high water-hardness score, and high alkalinity of alkaline detergent wash. Based on the findings of this study it can be concluded that TAC, PIC, LPC, and CC counts are of considerable value in identifying practices that could influence milk quality.

Research-articleMicrobiological quality of bulk tank raw milk in Prince Edward Island dairy herds

AbstractThe objectives of this study were to evaluate microbiological quality of bulk tank milk in Prince Edward Island, to evaluate correlation among milk quality criteria, and to determine seasonal effects on milk quality parameters. Bulk tank raw milk quality was evaluated on all Prince Edward Island dairy herds (n = 235) over a 2-yr period (March 2005 to March 2007). Biweekly total aerobic (TAC), preliminary incubation (PIC), laboratory pasteurization, and coliform (CC) counts were determined using a Petrifilm culture system. Additionally, bulk tank somatic cell count was determined weekly. The mean and median values were 12.8 × 103 and 4.9 × 103 cfu/mL for TAC, 29.6 × 103 and 13 × 103 cfu/mL for PIC, 87 and 12 cfu/mL for laboratory pasteurization count, 21 and 5 cfu/mL for CC, and 218 × 103 and 187 × 103 cells/mL for somatic cell count. There was moderate correlation (0.57) between TAC and PIC. All other correlation coefficients were low (<0.26). Correlation results suggest that a single quality parameter could not predict others used in this study. Seasonal data indicate that 1) in general, all counts tended to be low in winter, 2) the CC and somatic cell count were always high in summer, and 3) TAC tended to be high during summer.

The association between bulk tank milk analysis for raw milk quality and on-farm management practices

AbstractOur objective was to determine the risk factors associated with bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk. Bulk tank milk samples were collected from all Prince Edward Island dairy herds (n = 235) from March 2005 to March 2007. Biweekly total bacterial, preliminary incubation, laboratory pasteurization, and coliform counts were conducted using a Petrifilm culture system. Data for on-farm risk factors were collected via a mail-out survey which consisted of 4 main sections: (1) general farm demographics and management, (2) cow cleanliness and hygiene, (3) milking procedures and mastitis control, and (4) equipment maintenance and cleaning.Of 235 producers, 153 completed the mail-out survey giving a response rate of 65%. Both total aerobic and preliminary incubation counts were positively associated with the amount of soiling on the teats prior to udder preparation, manual cleaning of the bulk tank, and the use of a specific type of detergent. Additionally, various methods of premilking udder preparation were important, with pre-dip followed by drying being superior to other methods in reducing the bacterial counts. The laboratory pasteurization count was positively associated with the presence of a plate cooler and inadequate frequency of acid wash, whereas having a water purification system was negatively associated with laboratory pasteurization count. Finally, coliform count was negatively associated with clipping udder hair and automated washing of the bulk tank, whereas increasing herd size and inadequate frequency of acid wash were risk factors. Season was a significant predictor for all bacterial counts with the lowest counts tending to occur in winter.

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