Biography:

One of their most recent publications is Cumulative damage of reinforced concrete subjected to repeated impact. Which was published in journal Cement and Concrete Research.

More information about L.I. Knab research including statistics on their citations can be found on their Copernicus Academic profile page.

L.I. Knab's Articles: (2)

Cumulative damage of reinforced concrete subjected to repeated impact

AbstractThis study was performed to develop methods of measuring the cumulative damage of steel reinforced concrete slabs subjected to repeated impact. Cumulative damage was monitored by measuring the crater depth and the reduction in ultrasonic pulse velocity across the impact region. Crater depth generally increased with increasing number of impacts and therefore was determined to be a reasonable indicator of cumulative damage. The percent reduction in velocity generally increased with increasing number of impacts up to about 40 percent or more of the total number of impacts to failure. Beyond that, interpretation of the ultrasonic results with respect to the failure mechanism appears necessary. The addition of steel fibers to the bar grid reinforcement resulted in substantial increases (about 2 to 7 times or more) in the total number of impacts to failure as compared to specimens with only bar grid or expanded metal placed at the midpoint of the slab thickness.

Effects of maximum void size and aggregate characteristics on the strength of mortar

AbstractThe effects of the maximum void size and aggregate shape and roughness on the flexural strength of high strength mortar were investigated. Substantial reductions in the maximum void size and air content of quartz aggregate mortars resulted in flexural strength increases. These increases in flexural strength were somewhat lower than predicted by Griffith's theory, thus suggesting that the maximum void size did not act as the critical flaw controlling the flexural strength. Factors relating to the cement-aggregate bond, including aggregate shape and roughness, appeared to affect the flexural strength more than the maximum void size.

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