Biography:

In the past Nicole M. Cain has collaborated on articles with Chiara De Panfilis and Kevin B. Meehan. One of their most recent publications is The relationship between effortful control, current psychopathology and interpersonal difficulties in adulthood. Which was published in journal Comprehensive Psychiatry.

More information about Nicole M. Cain research including statistics on their citations can be found on their Copernicus Academic profile page.

Nicole M. Cain's Articles: (3)

The relationship between effortful control, current psychopathology and interpersonal difficulties in adulthood

AbstractThis study examined whether the relationship between low effortful control (EC), general psychopathology and interpersonal maladjustment previously reported among children extends to adulthood. Two hundred and forty undergraduate students were assessed using the EC scale of the Adult Temperament Questionnaire, the General Severity Index of the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-GSI) and the interpersonal distress index of the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems–Short Circumplex (IIP-distress). Both the BSI-GSI and the IIP-distress scores were related to low levels of EC. Furthermore, interpersonal distress mediated the association between low EC and greater psychopathology severity. These results suggest that deficits in regulatory temperament among adults may be associated with experiencing greater psychopathology distress, and that this relationship may be explained by an impairment in interpersonal adjustment. Such preliminary findings may constitute a useful starting point for investigating this hypothesis among clinical populations.

Rejection sensitivity and interpersonal behavior in daily life

Highlights•Rejection sensitivity (RS) fosters a self-perpetuating cycle of relational problems.•However, few studies evaluate longitudinal patterns of functioning in high RS.•Participants completed a 7-day event-contingent experience sampling study.•Those with high RS disconnect when perceiving low, negative affect in others.•This stance aims to avoid but likely invites the very rejection those with RS fear.

Narcissism at the crossroads: Phenotypic description of pathological narcissism across clinical theory, social/personality psychology, and psychiatric diagnosis

AbstractThis review documents two themes of emphasis found in phenotypic descriptions of pathological narcissism across clinical theory, social/personality psychology, and psychiatric diagnosis. Clinical theories of narcissism spanning 35 years consistently describe variations in the expression of pathological narcissism that emphasize either grandiosity or vulnerable affects and self-states. Recent research in social/personality psychology examining the structure of narcissistic personality traits consistently finds two broad factors representing Grandiosity–Exhibitionism and Vulnerability–Sensitivity–Depletion respectively. However, the majority of psychiatric criteria for narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) emphasize expressions of grandiosity. By placing most of the diagnostic emphasis on overt grandiosity, DSM NPD has been limited by poor discriminant validity, modest levels of temporal stability, and the lowest prevalence rate on Axis II. Despite converging support for two phenotypic themes associated with pathological narcissism, psychiatric diagnosis and social/personality psychology research often focus only on grandiosity in the assessment of narcissism. In contrast, clinical theory struggles with a proliferation of labels describing these broad phenotypic variations. We conclude that the construct of pathological narcissism is at a crossroads and provide recommendations for diagnostic assessment, clinical conceptualization, and future research that could lead to a more integrated understanding of narcissistic personality and narcissistic personality pathology.

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