Biography:

In the past William S. Roberts has collaborated on articles with Michael A. Finan and Richard Mann. One of their most recent publications is The effects of cold therapy on postoperative pain in gynecologic patients: A prospective, randomized study. Which was published in journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

More information about William S. Roberts research including statistics on their citations can be found on their Copernicus Academic profile page.

William S. Roberts's Articles: (13)

The effects of cold therapy on postoperative pain in gynecologic patients: A prospective, randomized study

Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of cold therapy on the subjective assessment of pain, analgesic requirements, and wound complications in female patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.Study Design: Twenty-seven patients were entered in the study in a prospective, randomized fashion. The Hot/Ice Thermal Blanket was applied to 13 patients, and 12 patients were in the control group. All patients underwent exploratory laparotomy and received postoperative pain relief with intravenously self-administered morphine sulfate through a patient-controlled analgesic pump.Results: Compared with the control group (0.363 ± 0.118 mg/kg/day), the cold pack group used more morphine sulfate on the first postoperative day (0.529 ± 0.236 mg/kg/day, p < 0.05). The mean amount of morphine sulfate used by both groups was similar on postoperative day 2.Conclusion: We conclude that the cold pack does not improve postoperative pain control in gynecologic patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy.

The effects of cold therapy on postoperative pain in gynecologic patients: A prospective, randomized study

Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of cold therapy on the subjective assessment of pain, analgesic requirements, and wound complications in female patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.Study Design: Twenty-seven patients were entered in the study in a prospective, randomized fashion. The Hot/Ice Thermal Blanket was applied to 13 patients, and 12 patients were in the control group. All patients underwent exploratory laparotomy and received postoperative pain relief with intravenously self-administered morphine sulfate through a patient-controlled analgesic pump.Results: Compared with the control group (0.363 ± 0.118 mg/kg/day), the cold pack group used more morphine sulfate on the first postoperative day (0.529 ± 0.236 mg/kg/day, p < 0.05). The mean amount of morphine sulfate used by both groups was similar on postoperative day 2.Conclusion: We conclude that the cold pack does not improve postoperative pain control in gynecologic patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy.

The effects of cold therapy on postoperative pain in gynecologic patients: A prospective, randomized study

Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of cold therapy on the subjective assessment of pain, analgesic requirements, and wound complications in female patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.Study Design: Twenty-seven patients were entered in the study in a prospective, randomized fashion. The Hot/Ice Thermal Blanket was applied to 13 patients, and 12 patients were in the control group. All patients underwent exploratory laparotomy and received postoperative pain relief with intravenously self-administered morphine sulfate through a patient-controlled analgesic pump.Results: Compared with the control group (0.363 ± 0.118 mg/kg/day), the cold pack group used more morphine sulfate on the first postoperative day (0.529 ± 0.236 mg/kg/day, p < 0.05). The mean amount of morphine sulfate used by both groups was similar on postoperative day 2.Conclusion: We conclude that the cold pack does not improve postoperative pain control in gynecologic patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy.

The effects of cold therapy on postoperative pain in gynecologic patients: A prospective, randomized study

Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of cold therapy on the subjective assessment of pain, analgesic requirements, and wound complications in female patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.Study Design: Twenty-seven patients were entered in the study in a prospective, randomized fashion. The Hot/Ice Thermal Blanket was applied to 13 patients, and 12 patients were in the control group. All patients underwent exploratory laparotomy and received postoperative pain relief with intravenously self-administered morphine sulfate through a patient-controlled analgesic pump.Results: Compared with the control group (0.363 ± 0.118 mg/kg/day), the cold pack group used more morphine sulfate on the first postoperative day (0.529 ± 0.236 mg/kg/day, p < 0.05). The mean amount of morphine sulfate used by both groups was similar on postoperative day 2.Conclusion: We conclude that the cold pack does not improve postoperative pain control in gynecologic patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy.

The effects of cold therapy on postoperative pain in gynecologic patients: A prospective, randomized study

Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of cold therapy on the subjective assessment of pain, analgesic requirements, and wound complications in female patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.Study Design: Twenty-seven patients were entered in the study in a prospective, randomized fashion. The Hot/Ice Thermal Blanket was applied to 13 patients, and 12 patients were in the control group. All patients underwent exploratory laparotomy and received postoperative pain relief with intravenously self-administered morphine sulfate through a patient-controlled analgesic pump.Results: Compared with the control group (0.363 ± 0.118 mg/kg/day), the cold pack group used more morphine sulfate on the first postoperative day (0.529 ± 0.236 mg/kg/day, p < 0.05). The mean amount of morphine sulfate used by both groups was similar on postoperative day 2.Conclusion: We conclude that the cold pack does not improve postoperative pain control in gynecologic patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy.

Peritoneal cytology and invasive carcinoma of the cervix

AbstractOne hundred thirty-nine patients with invasive carcinoma of the cervix underwent laparotomy at the University of South Florida between February 1980 and November 1983. One hundred nineteen had laparotomy prior to treatment and 20 after treatment for recurrence or some other reason. One hundred twenty patients had negative peritoneal cytology, 8 had equivocal cytology and 11 had positive cytology. Positive peritoneal cytology was more common in higher-stage disease and was statistically significantly more common in patients with positive retroperitoneal lymph nodes (P < 0.05). The rate of peritoneal cytologic positivity in patients with squamous carcinoma was the same as that for adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma. Positive peritoneal cytology was associated with a very poor prognosis but was associated with other poor prognostic factors in all but 1 patient. Equivocal cytology did not seem to be of any particular significance. No patient in this series had an alteration in treatment planning based on peritoneal cytology. The utility and future of peritoneal cytology in invasive carcinoma of the cervix are discussed.

Case reportPrimary lymphoma of the uterine cervix

AbstractPrimary lymphoma of the cervix is very rare. A case report is presented and 24 cases published in the English literature are reviewed. Evaluation, staging, treatment, and prognosis of this rare tumor are discussed.

Basal cell carcinoma of the vulva with inguinal lymph node metastases

AbstractBasal cell carcinoma of the vulva is a rare neoplasm which is generally thought to be indolent, locally invasive, and nonmetastasizing. A case of basal cell carcinoma of the vulva with metastases to the ipsilateral inguinal lymph nodes is presented. This is the third well-documented case in the literature of vulvar basal cell carcinoma with inguinal lymph node metastases.

SAAOG paperThe vascular portion of the cardinal ligament: surgical significance during radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer

ObjectiveThe objective of the study was to analyze the histopathologic content of the vascular portion of the cardinal ligament in patients undergoing radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer.Study DesignThe vascular portion of the cardinal ligament was completely removed during radical hysterectomy. The maximum cervical diameter and length of the vascular ligament were measured on the fresh specimen. After inking, the pathologist separated and embedded the entire vascular segment from each side. Microscopic examination followed.ResultsEighty-four patients were available for analysis. The mean cervical diameter was 3.9 cm (2-8), whereas the mean vascular segment length on the right and left sides were 4 cm (1-10) and 3.8 cm (1-7), respectively. Mean number of vascular segment lymph nodes were as follows: medial right = 0.7 (0-4), medial left = 0.6 (0-5), lateral right = 0.4 (0-3), and lateral left = 0.6 (0-6). Mean diameter of medial and lateral lymph nodes were 2 mm (0.25-8) and 3.3 mm (0.25-16), respectively. The length of the vascular segment correlated inversely with maximum cervical diameter. Thirty-one percent (26 of 84) had positive pelvic side wall lymph nodes. Fourteen patients had positive vascular segment lymph nodes (1 positive = 7, more than 1 positive = 7). Three of 7 patients had bilateral positive vascular segment lymph nodes; all 7 had microscopic disease in the paravaginal soft tissue, and all 7 had positive pelvic side wall lymph nodes (6 of 7 bilateral). Including the 14 patients, a total of 19 had nodal or nonnodal microscopic disease in the vascular segment. Of these, 7 had disease in the lateral half of the vascular ligament. Histologic sectioning revealed nerve twigs and/or scattered ganglia in the vascular segment but no large nerve trunks.ConclusionAmong a population of women with high-risk, early-stage cervical cancer, the lateral vascular segment of the cardinal ligament contained metastatic disease in a substantial number of patients. This segment contains no major nerve trunks. When radical hysterectomy is chosen as primary treatment for such patients, the vascular segment of the cardinal ligament should be completely excised.

Meeting paperSAAOG papersFactors associated with improved toxicity and tolerability of intraperitoneal chemotherapy in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancers

ObjectiveWe sought to evaluate the toxicity and tolerability of the intraperitoneal/intravenous regimen by comparing the modified regimen that is used at the Moffitt Cancer Center vs the published findings of the Gynecologic Oncology Group Study 172.Study DesignUsing the Moffitt database, we evaluated the outcomes of patients who underwent primary optimal cytoreduction for stage IIC-IV epithelial ovarian, tubal, and peritoneal carcinoma followed by the intent-to-treat with intraperitoneal/intravenous chemotherapy. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3.0) was used to grade adverse events.ResultsWe analyzed patient data from 2006-2011 and identified 69 patients who met our inclusion criteria. The most frequent grade 3/4 toxicities were neutropenia (48%), gastrointestinal (9%), metabolic (9%), and infection (5%). Remaining toxicities occurred in <5% of patients. Patients received a greater number of cycles compared with the Gynecologic Oncology Group Study 172 (4.28 vs 3.66, respectively; P = .0088).ConclusionWith the use of supportive care and the preemptive management of established side-effects, the associated toxicities and tolerability of intraperitoneal chemotherapy can be improved.

Factors affecting the incidence of infectious morbidity after radical hysterectomy

A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed to assess the value of cefoxitin for prophylaxis against postoperative infection following radical hysterectomy. Infectious morbidity was observed in 35% of 43 patients in the control group and 23% of 31 in the cefoxitin group. In seven control patients (16%) and one patient (3%) in the cefoxitin group the infections were related to the surgical site (p = 0.07). These differences did not achieve statistical significance. Examination of the data revealed a number of other factors, including operating time, patient weight, blood loss, and blood replacement, that were significantly related to the incidence of infectious morbidity. Comparison of the results of the present study with those in the literature indicates that a careful examination of the circumstances prevailing in any particular institution is necessary before a decision is made on strategies to combat infectious morbidity after radical hysterectomy.

Regular ArticleGastrostomy Tubes after Gynecologic Oncologic Surgery

AbstractIn order to prevent the complications of long-term nasogastric suctioning and increase patient comfort, we have been using gastrostomy tubes (G-tubes) in gynecologic oncology patients who are deemed to be at risk for protracted postoperative bowel dysfunction. This study describes our patient selection criteria and evaluates the results with 35 MIC (Medical Innovation Corporation, Milpitas, CA) gastrostomy tubes inserted between September 1, 1992 and April 30, 1993. The procedure is technically easy and adds approximately 10 min to operating time. The tabes were well tolerated by the patients over periods ranging from 5 to 135 days. All tubes were used for postoperative gastric drainage and in addition, eight tubes were used for short-term enteral feeding. One patient with short bowel syndrome continued enteral nutritional supplementation at home. Twenty patients were discharged with their G-tubes in situ . Five of these patients required continuous gastric drainage because of obstruction of gastric emptying or small bowel by advanced tumor, and four of them were taking full liquids orally prior to discharge from the hospital. Gastrostomy tubes are convenient adjuncts to postoperative care of the gynecologic oncology patient and afford palliation with few complications to patients dying with bowel obstruction.

ReviewAdvances in the application of scanning electrochemical microscopy to bioanalytical systems

AbstractScanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is a powerful surface characterisation technique that allows for the electrochemical profiling of surfaces with sub micrometer resolution.While SECM has been most widely used to electrochemically study and profile non-biological surfaces and processes, the technique has in recent years, been increasingly used for the study of biological systems – and this is the focus of this review.An overview of SECM and how the technique may be applied to the study of biological systems will first be given. SECM and its application to the study of cells, enzymes and DNA will each be considered in detail. The review will conclude with a discussion of future directions and scope for further developments and applications.

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