Biography:

In the past John J. Guinan has collaborated on articles with James B. Kobler and Hui Nam. One of their most recent publications is The recruitment order of stapedius motoneurons in the acoustic reflex varies with sound laterality. Which was published in journal Brain Research.

More information about John J. Guinan research including statistics on their citations can be found on their Copernicus Academic profile page.

John J. Guinan's Articles: (5)

The recruitment order of stapedius motoneurons in the acoustic reflex varies with sound laterality

AbstractIn many muscles, motor units are recruited in a fixed order with increasing strength of muscular contraction. We show that for the stapedius muscle of the cat, vastly different recruitment orders can be obtained, depending on which ear is acoustically stimulated. The data support the idea that the distribution of inputs to a motoneuron pool can be inhomogeneous and a significant factor in determining recruitment order.

The recruitment order of stapedius motoneurons in the acoustic reflex varies with sound laterality

AbstractIn many muscles, motor units are recruited in a fixed order with increasing strength of muscular contraction. We show that for the stapedius muscle of the cat, vastly different recruitment orders can be obtained, depending on which ear is acoustically stimulated. The data support the idea that the distribution of inputs to a motoneuron pool can be inhomogeneous and a significant factor in determining recruitment order.

Asymmetries in the acoustic reflexes of the cat stapedius muscle

AbstractElectromyographic activity (EMG) was used to monitor contractions of the stapedius muscle evoked by both ipsilateral and contralateral sound in ketamine-anesthetized or decerebrate cats. After the onset of a continuing tone, stapedius EMG often had bursts of activity at regular intervals; similar bursts were also observed in the EMG from the tensor tympani muscle. Plots of the r.m.s. amplitude of stapedius-EMG versus sound level usually had a steep rising phase (small dynamic range) and a plateau at high sound levels. For sound stimulation at 1 kHz, the crossed stapedius reflex had a lower maximum amplitude (ave. amplitude ratio: 0.37) and a higher threshold (ave. 8 dB) than the uncrossed reflex. Since the uncrossed reflex evokes considerably more stapedius EMG than does the crossed reflex, it probably produces correspondingly greater changes in middle-ear sound transmission.

ReviewProgress in cochlear physiology after Békésy

AbstractIn the fifty years since Békésy was awarded the Nobel Prize, cochlear physiology has blossomed. Many topics that are now current are things Békésy could not have imagined. In this review we start by describing progress in understanding the origin of cochlear gross potentials, particularly the cochlear microphonic, an area in which Békésy had extensive experience. We then review progress in areas of cochlear physiology that were mostly unknown to Békésy, including: (1) stereocilia mechano-electrical transduction, force production, and response amplification, (2) outer hair cell (OHC) somatic motility and its molecular basis in prestin, (3) cochlear amplification and related micromechanics, including the evidence that prestin is the main motor for cochlear amplification, (4) the influence of the tectorial membrane, (5) cochlear micromechanics and the mechanical drives to inner hair cell stereocilia, (6) otoacoustic emissions, and (7) olivocochlear efferents and their influence on cochlear physiology. We then return to a subject that Békésy knew well: cochlear fluids and standing currents, as well as our present understanding of energy dependence on the lateral wall of the cochlea. Finally, we touch on cochlear pathologies including noise damage and aging, with an emphasis on where the field might go in the future.

Research PaperLow-frequency bias tone suppression of auditory-nerve responses to low-level clicks and tones

Highlights•Do low-frequency “bias” tones (BTs) suppress tone and click responses similarly?•BT-induced synchronization index (SI) was measured in cat auditory-nerve fibers.•After excluding BT excitation, click and tone BT-suppression phases were similar.•BT effects suggest systematic variation in hair cell transduction along the cochlea.•Distortion in IHC drives may account for auditory-nerve-fiber peak splitting.

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