Biography:

In the past C. Fauquet has collaborated on articles with D. Fargette and P. Dannetun. One of their most recent publications is Adsorption of monoethanolamine on clean, oxidized and hydroxylated aluminium surfaces: a model for amine-cured epoxy/aluminium interfaces. Which was published in journal Applied Surface Science.

More information about C. Fauquet research including statistics on their citations can be found on their Copernicus Academic profile page.

C. Fauquet's Articles: (3)

Adsorption of monoethanolamine on clean, oxidized and hydroxylated aluminium surfaces: a model for amine-cured epoxy/aluminium interfaces

AbstractThe interaction of 1-amino-2-hydroxyethane (monoethanolamine) with clean Al(100), in-situ oxidized Al(100) and in-situ hydroxylated Al(100) has been investigated using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). It has been shown that, on all these surfaces, adsorption of monoethanolamine can be interpreted in the framework of the Hard and Soft Acid Base (HSAB) principle. However, the detailed mechanism differs for each surface: (i) monoethanolamine interacts with clean Al(100) through its amine termination via a Lewis-like acid-base reaction; (ii) monoethanolamine interacts with oxidized Al(100) through its alcohol termination via a Lewis-like acid-base reaction; (iii) monoethanolamine interacts with hydroxylated Al(100) through its alcohol termination via a Brönsted-like acid-base reaction.

Comparative epidemiology of three tropical whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses

AbstractSpatial and temporal patterns of spread of African cassava mosaic, okra leaf curl and tobacco leaf curl viruses in West Africa, East Africa and India share some general characteristics. By comparing the results and running new analyses on available data, it is shown that the epidemiology of these viruses is controlled by the same key variables. For instance, spatial spread is characterised by strong border effects due to accumulation of whitefly vectors (Bemisia tabaci) on the wind-exposed field borders under the influence of the prevailing wind. This results in pronouned environmental gradients of disease. Temporal patterns of virus spread are driven by the sinusoidal fluctuation of temperature over the year which correspond with changes of whitefly populations.

The evolution of charge-induced gap states in degenerate and non-degenerate conjugated molecules and polymers as studied by photoelectron spectroscopy

AbstractWe report the results of ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) studies of the interaction between sodium and conjugated systems for a series of diphenylpolyees and diffrent oligomers of poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV). The diphenylpolyenes include molecules containing two (i.e., stilbene) to 14 carbon atoms in the polyene part; stilbene itself can also be considered as a phenyl-capped monomer of PPV. Furthermore, a PPV oligomer with three phenylene units, as well as PPV itself, has been studied. The experimental results are interpreted with the help of quantum-chemical calculations using the Hartree-Fock semi-empirical Austin Model 1 (AM1) and valence-effective Hamiltonian (VEH) methods. An important result is that all the systems react strongly with sodium; at high doping levels two new doping-induced states are detected above the valence band edge of the pristine material. In the case of saturation-doped diphenylpolyenes (i.e., two sodiums per molecule), the new states can be discussed in terms of soliton-antisoliton pairs confined within the polyene part of the molecules; in contrast, the self-localized states induced in PPV and its oligomers have to be referred to as bipolarons.

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