Biography:

In the past S.C. Chhabra has collaborated on articles with G.N. Wanyoike. One of their most recent publications is Plants used in traditional medicine in Eastern Tanzania. II. Angiosperms (capparidaceae to ebenaceae). Which was published in journal Journal of Ethnopharmacology.

More information about S.C. Chhabra research including statistics on their citations can be found on their Copernicus Academic profile page.

S.C. Chhabra's Articles: (3)

Plants used in traditional medicine in Eastern Tanzania. II. Angiosperms (capparidaceae to ebenaceae)

AbstractSixty-nine plants are listed, which are used by traditional healers in five regions of Eastern Tanzania, Coast, Dar es Salaam, Kilimanjaro, Morogoro and Tanga. For each species the botanical name, vernacular name, collection number, locality, habit, distribution and medicinal uses are given. Results of a literature survey on medicinal uses, isolated constituents, and pharmacological effects are also provided.

Plants used in traditional medicine in Eastern Tanzania. IV. Angiosperms (Mimosaceae to Papilionaceae)

AbstractSixty-nine Angiosperms (Mimosaceae to Papilionaceae) are listed, which are used by traditional healers in five regions of Eastern Tanzania; namely, Coast, Dar es Salaam, Kilimanjaro, Morogoro and Tanga. For each species listed, the botanical name, vernacular name, collection number, locality, habit, distribution and medicinal uses are given. Additionally, information from the literature on medicinal uses, chemical constituents, and pharmacological effects are also provided.

Brine shrimp toxicity and antiplasmodial activity of five Kenyan medicinal plants

AbstractThe organic extracts of leaves and roots of five plants used for treating malaria in Central, Nairobi and Rift Valley Provinces, Kenya were tested for brine shrimp lethality and in vitro antiplasmodial activity against chloroquine sensitive and resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Of the plants tested, 60% were toxic to the brine shrimp (LC50<30 μg/ml) and eight out of ten plant parts (80%) showed in vitro antiplasmodial activity (IC50<50 μg/ml). Among the extracts screened, the leaves of Cyathula polcephala had the highest toxicity to the brine shrimp (LC50=2.9 μg/ml) while the leaves of Pentas longiflora had the best antiplasmodial activity (IC50=11.4 μg/ml). The plant extracts with low IC50 values are potential sources for novel antiplasmodial compounds.

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