Bladder CancerUroVysion Compared with Cytology and Quantitative Cytology in the Surveillance of Non–Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer
Review articleOpen access
Abstract:

AbstractObjectivesThe multitarget fluorescence in situ hybridization probe set Vysis UroVysion, consisting of probes for chromosomes 3, 7, and 17 and for the 9p21 band, was studied to evaluate its value in the follow-up of patients with bladder cancer. The results were compared with conventional cytology and quantitative cytology (Quanticyt). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether UroVysion is a better adjunct to urethrocystoscopy than cytology and quantitative cytology.MethodsUroVysion, cytology, and quantitative cytology were performed on 113 voided urinary samples of 105 patients under surveillance for non–muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Before urethrocystoscopy or transurethral resection of the bladder, a voided urinary sample was obtained. Results of all tests were compared to evaluate the value of UroVysion.ResultsSixty-four patients had biopsy-proven urothelial cell carcinoma. Sensitivity and specificity were, respectively, 39.1% and 89.7% for UroVysion, 40.6% and 89.7% for cytology, and 42.1% and 67.9% for quantitative cytology. When the UroVysion test and cytology were combined, sensitivity increased to 53.1%, but specificity decreased to 79.5%. Detection of Ta tumours was equal for cytology and UroVysion (26.7%), detection of T1 and T2–T4 samples by UroVysion was 60% and 50%, respectively. Detection of grade 1, 2, and 3 tumours by UroVysion was 21.4%, 36.8%, and 66.7%, respectively. In four cases the UroVysion test was positive, but no abnormalities were seen at cystoscopy.ConclusionsOur data suggest that the use of UroVysion provides no improvement over cytology or quantitative cytology in the diagnosis of recurrent non–muscle-invasive bladder tumours.

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